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By Tony Hall, Managing Director, Navigator Consulting

I just had such a great experience designing a new logo for our unique Recruitment Summit@Sea and Navigator’s Best Practice Certification.

Previously I used a local designer and paid hundreds of dollars and the process took weeks of frustrating edits. I think I even paid for the agency account management team to fly in from another state.

Then I recently discovered freelancer.com.  Ok so this Australian listed (ASX:FLN) success story has been around for quite some time  but you know how it is when you have heard of a good tech solution but have never had time to try it.

It was so easy. Simple registration, post the project and within minutes bids for the project flooded in from all over the world.

You can even post a cash prize for the best design and award it to the winner.

For less than $200 I chose Divya from India based on his good communication and excellent reviews other customers gave him. There were designers from every country imaginable.

Divya was a joy to work with – took a clear brief, communicated well patiently made changes and delivered outstanding work on the two logos above. He is the perfect staff member – never complained or took sick days and was always happy to help.

Also added to our virtual team is Ilian from Bulgaria – a very talented web developer who is extremely skilled, communicates in perfect English and provides first class customer service at a very reasonable price.

Our business has now outsourced:

Accounting to Xero

Graphic Design to Divya in India

Web Development to Ilian in Bulgaria

Marketing to Jane in the Philippines

Marketing comms to local interns

… all of which enables are senior people to spend more time building relationships and helping recruitment business leaders.

I cant help but think this is the future of many types of work – outsourced and offshored – high quality, great service and low cost.

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www.navigatorconsult.com

 

 

By Tony Hall, Navigator Consulting

Offshore resourcing has the dual benefit of dramatically reducing cost while increasing the service your senior people can provide to fee paying clients.

For the price of one local resourcer, recruitment firms can hire four very experienced offshore resourcers and allow your business to add more revenue generating staff.

1 ONSHORE = 4 OFFSHORE WITH 4 X THE PRODUCTIVITY AND 5 X THE EXPERIENCE.

SAVE 75% OF COST AND INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY 400%

The Philippines has a highly educated and well-trained recruitment workforce with perfect English skills and a very high level of technical competence.

For as little as $10 an hour – highly experienced offshore recruitment resourcers can support recruitment fee earners to spend more time in front of candidates and clients and subsequently bill more.

The average desk cost of a local resourcer including salary, superannuation, insurances, leave, incentives, sick days, desk and equipment is approximately $100,000 pa.

The average cost of an experienced offshore resourcer is $25,000 a year – one quarter the cost.

BENEFITS

Adding offshore recruitment resourcers to your team is great for:

– increasing billings

– retaining loyal consulting staff

– reducing operating costs

– boosting productivity

– streamlining the recruitment process

– giving candidates and clients faster service

– preventing clients from recruiting themselves

For many reasons – legal, communication, financial etc – it is very important to use an external provider to recruit and manage your offshore workforce in the Philippines. 

Get started

The best way to get started is to sit down with an offshoring specialist to :

  1. Discuss your short and long term business goals
  2. Isolate which functions of your business are working and which are not
  3. Document tasks most suitable for offshoring
  4. Choose the most appropriate office model
  5. Decide on your recruitment strategy
  6. Identify tools of trade required
  7. Develop a financial business case for offshoring
  8. Design an implementation plan
  9. Prepare an ongoing management plan

To learn more about the proven benefits of offshore resourcing please  Contact Us at your convenience.

Contact Us for our FREE Business Case For Offshoring – Document is sent as a PDF.

tony hall

After 17 years of helping to increase performance and grow recruitment businesses, I continue to learn so much about critical success factors.

Here is my Top 5 so far.

Great recruitment companies:

1. Focus on specialist markets and build strong, long term relationships with clients and candidates

2. Establish a quality program to separate them from the resume flickers

3. Treat their staff like clients with strong communication, goals, expectations and support

4. Train the team regularly to increase performance and retention

5. Have a well communicated plan regarding direction, culture and vision.

There is so much more but these five cover a wide range of factors which separate the best recruitment firms from their competitors and encourage clients to outsource rather than bring their recruitment in-house.

By Tony Hall, Managing Director, Navigator Consulting

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Slow, deliberate and using best practice always wins in life and in business.

Some of my favourite quotes from the book – In Praise of Slowness:

“Spending more time with friends and family costs nothing. Nor does walking, cooking, meditating, making love, reading or eating dinner at the table instead of in front of the television. Simply resisting the urge to hurry is free.”
“The great benefit of slowing down is reclaiming the time and tranquility to make meaningful connections–with people, with culture, with work, with nature, with our own bodies and minds”
“Speed can give you a great feeling of excitement, and there is a place for that in life and in music,” says Kliemt. “But you have to draw the line, and not always use speed. It is stupid to drink a glass of wine quickly. And it is stupid to play Mozart too fast.”
“In our hedonistic age, the Slow movement has a marketing ace up its sleeve: it peddles pleasure. The central tenet of the Slow philosophy is taking the time to do things properly, and thereby enjoy them more.”
“Much better to do fewer things and have time to make the most of them.”
“This is where our obsession with going fast and saving time leads. To road rage, air rage, shopping rage, relationship rage, office rage, vacation rage, gym rage. Thanks to speed, we live in the age of rage.”
“Slower, it turns out, often means better – better health, better work, better business, better family life, better exercise, better cuisine and better sex.”
“When people moan, “Oh, I’m so busy, I’m run off my feet, my life is a blur, I haven’t got time for anything,” what they often mean is, “Look at me: I am hugely important, exciting and energetic.”
“Being Slow means that you control the rhythms of your own life. You decide how fast you have to go in any given context. If today I want to go fast, I go fast; if tomorrow I want to go slow, I go slow. What we are fighting for is the right to determine our own tempos.”
“We affirm that the world’s magnificence has been enriched by a new beauty: the beauty of speed. —FUTURIST MANIFESTO, 1909”
“We are slaves to our schedules.”
“Much has already been destroyed. We have forgotten how to look forward to things, and how to enjoy the moment when they arrive.”
“While the rest of the world roars on, a large and growing minority is choosing not to do everything at full-throttle. In every human endeavour you can think of, from sex, work and exercise to food, medicine and urban design, these rebels are doing the unthinkable – they are making room for slowness. And the good news is that decelerating works.”
“Now is the moment to define our terms. In this book, Fast and Slow do more than just describe a rate of change. They are shorthand for ways of being, or philosophies of life. Fast is busy, controlling, aggressive, hurried, analytical, stressed, superficial, impatient, active, quantity-over-quality. Slow is the opposite: calm, careful, receptive, still, intuitive, unhurried, patient, reflective, quality-over-quantity. It is about making real and meaningful connections – with people, culture, work, food, everything.”
“The slow movement is not about doing everything at a snail’s pace. Nor is it a Luddite attempt to drag the whole planet back to some pre-industrial utopia. The movement is made up of people who want to live better in a fast-paced, modern world. The slow philosophy can be summed up in a single word: balance. Be fast when it makes sense to be fast, and be slow when slowness is called for. Seek to live at what musicians call the tempo giusto – the right speed.”
“Speed has helped to remake our world in ways that are wonderful and liberating. Who wants to live without the internet or jet travel? The problem is that our love of speed, our obsession with doing more and more in less and less time, has gone too far, it has turned into an addiction, a kind of idolatry. Even when speed starts to backfire, we invoke the go-faster gospel.”
“Companies also pay a heavy price for imposing a long-hours culture. Productivity is notoriously hard to measure, but academics agree that overwork eventually hits the bottom line. It is common sense: we are less productive when we are tired, stressed, unhappy or unhealthy. According to the International Labour Organization, workers in Belgium, France and Norway are all more productive per hour than are Americans. The British clock up more time on the job than do most Europeans, and have one of the continent’s poorest rates of hourly productivity to show for it. Working less often means working better.”
“In this media-drenched, data-rich, channel-surfing, computer-gaming age, we have lost the art of doing nothing, of shutting out the background noise and distractions, of slowing down and simply being alone with our thoughts.”
“Urban life itself acts as a giant particle accelerator. When people move to the city, they start to do everything faster.”
“The clock is the operating system of modern capitalism, the thing that makes everything else possible – meetings, deadlines, contracts, manufacturing processes, schedules, working shifts.”
“So the Cassandras who warned that the thirty-five-hour week would send the French economy into instant meltdown have been proved wrong. The gross domestic product has grown, and unemployment, though still above the EU average, has fallen. Productivity also remains high. Indeed, some evidence suggests that many French workers are more productive now. With less time on the job, and more leisure to look forward to, they make greater efforts to finish their work before clocking off.”
“Then there is the curse of multi-tasking. Doing two things at once seems so clever, so efficient, so modern. And yet what it often means is doing two things not very well. Like many people, I read the paper while watching TV—and find that I get less out of both.”
“As it turns out, people who cut their work hours often take a smaller hit financially than they expect. That is because spending less time on the job means spending less money on the things that allow us to work: transport, parking, eating out, coffee, convenience food, childcare, laundry, retail therapy. A smaller income also translates into a smaller tax bill. In one Canadian study, some workers who took a pay cut in return for shorter hours actually ended up with more money in the bank at the end of the month.”
“Doing two things at once seems so clever, so efficient, so modern. And yet what it often means is doing two things not very well.”
“Instead of thinking deeply, or letting an idea simmer in the back of the mind, our instinct now is to reach for the nearest sound bite.”
“Our impatience is so implacable that, as actress-author Carrie Fisher quipped, even “instant gratification takes too long.”
“In the States, we think we do things better because we do them faster. And it’s very easy to get sucked into that lifestyle. But when you see how the French or the Italians eat, how much time and respect they give to food, you realize how wrong the American way can be.”
“When it comes to academic life, Lewis favours the same less-is-more approach. Get plenty of rest and relaxation, he says, and be sure to cultivate the art of doing nothing. “Empty time is not a vacuum to be filled,” writes the dean. “It is the thing that enables the other things on your mind to be creatively rearranged, like the empty square in the 4 × 4 puzzle that makes it possible to move the other fifteen pieces around.” In other words, doing nothing, being Slow, is an essential part of good thinking.”

 

 

 

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