australia-unemployment-rate@3x

No wonder it is difficult to find quality new staff

Unemployment Down – Job Vacancies Up = Staff Shortages

Australia’s unemployment rate is close to a 10 year low of 5.4%. It is often argued we are actually close to full employment because a large portion of this group choose to remain unemployed for many reasons. Over the past 12 months, there have now been 239,373 jobs created, in seasonally adjusted terms, at an annual growth rate of 2% – up from 0.9% in February.

A quick look at seek.com.au shows a whopping 168,173 job openings Australia-wide.

Growth Sectors are:

Engineering, construction, mining/resources, energy, infrastructure, ICT, healthcare, manufacturing, transport logistics and trades.

If you are supplying to these sectors it is prudent to stand out from your competitors and maximise new business efforts while the market is strong.

Declining Sectors are:

Retail and consumer

Retail is under considerable pressure due to the convenience and low price of online shopping, with weakness in this sector unlikely to improve.

By state:

While NSW and Victoria continue to dominate, QLD remains strong and double digit recoveries in job advertising were reported in WA and SA.

Sourcing Of Staff

For firms looking to source staff, the market is now competitive as many previous economic boom times. Growth is likely to become restricted by the lack of supply of talent with specific skills in new business development.

Typical methods of sourcing staff are:

1. Advertising  – fast and low cost but patchy responses and only attracts candidates actively looking for a new job.

2. Headhunting – slow and expensive but allows firms to cherry pick high performers on competitor companies

3. Word of mouth referrals – slow and but the source of strong performers

4. Recruiters – costly but not so if they save you significant time and deliver hard to find talent to grow your business

Action

The only way to profitably grow any business is to maintain operational efficiency and add high performing staff. Staff turnover is inevitable in such a strong market which makes new hiring activity and even higher priority.

For ideas on attracting high performing staff into your business, please email me anytime on th@navigatorconsult.com

Tony Hall is Managing Director of business growth consulting firm Navigator Consulting.

Please contact us for more information on:

– Sourcing high performing sales and recruitment leaders

– low lost, highly efficient, offshore resourcers, researchers and admin staff

– standing out from competitors and winning new business with Recruitment Industry Best Practice Certification

 

Transforming Your Firm Into A Valuable Asset

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Captain’s Table Sydney – Wednesday, 30 August 12-2pm

Venue: Gumtree Australia, Level 18, 1 York St Sydney

Great Value – only $50 including lunch.

– Industry round table for astute owners and leaders of quality recruitment companies.

BOOK EARLY – ONLY 25 Places available – Book HERE Via Eventbrite

Please join us @Gumtree Australia for a powerful discussion with industry M&A specialist Andrew Cassin who shares his insights into building your recruitment business into a valuable asset.

People start their own recruitment company for many reasons – dissatisfaction with a current employer, wanting to try a new way or the desire to build their own company. Many also start one with the aim to build an asset to sell later and retire early. That goal is in reach of every recruitment company but many fail to take the necessary steps to achieve it. The company you started becomes just another job with with so much administration and little time to work on the business itself.

Industry growth consultant , Andrew Cassin will share his practical knowledge gained over many years of experience into how you can transform your company into a powerful asset.

The highly interactive session will cover:

– What are the attributes of a high performing asset
– Why preparing for sale or succession with a buyer’s mindset is so critical
– Where business owners invariably fail to prepare effectively and how to avoid it
– How to apply product development and marketing strategies to succession or exit preparation
– Please book in quickly to gain the knowledge, insights and practical tips to grow your business.

All attendees will receive a FREE copy of Andrew Cassins book “On Your Terms: 101 ways to prepare a business for sale or succession.”

Agenda
12:00 – Arrive, networking and lunch

12:30 – Guest Speaker: Andrew Cassin

13:45 – Q&A and Networking time

14:00 – Close

About Andrew Cassin

Andrew commenced his consulting career in 1993. Since establising Acquisiti, he has been retained as a consultant by dozens of business principals, completed business sales & capital raisings and facilitated mergers & acquisitions for SME clients.

Industry sectors in which Andrew has valuable experience include recruitment, marketing/communications, Information Technology, liquor, not for profit, healthcare and financial services. Andrew’s clients’ requirements have taken him to Hong Kong, Singapore, the USA and the UK to complement his primary base of knowledge in Australia.

About Captain’s Table

Captain’s Table is a professionally-facilitated forum for owners and leaders of recruitment businesses. Attendees are encouraged to share experiences and engage in discussions. As an industry knowledge group session, the attendees help shape these monthly meetings and content is developed in-line with the feedback of the attendees to ensure that the events are topical, interesting and meaningful for attendees.

Brought to you by: Gumtree Australia, Job Adder and Navigator Consulting

(To help cover the costs of organisation, marketing, catering and guest speakers we now charge a nominal $50 to attend. Rest assured you will always receive very good value for money and many ideas to help build a high performing recruitment company.)

***Only 25 seats available so please BOOK EARLY  Book HERE Via Eventbrite***

Captain's_Table Good Quality

TOP 10: Recruiter Retention and Performance

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As discussed at Captain’s Table Sydney, Hyatt Regency Hotel, 1 August 2017

People leave companies for many reasons. Conversely there are many reasons people stay. We have researched numerous HR articles from around the globe to provide a summary list of the best ways to retain great people.

1. Competitive remuneration
– If you pay below market your people are more likely to look around
– Pay slightly higher than the marker and you are more likelky to attract and retain good people
– Money is not everything but nobody wants to be underpaid

2. Clear Career Path
– People want to know they will progress
– Do you have a clear career path for all staff?
– So often the reason for leaving is lack of career progression

3. Learning & Development
– Rarely will people leave if they are learning and growing
– Without professional development, staff will feel they need to move on the learn more and progress their careers
– L&D is a great way to upskill and retain quality people

4. Clear Expectations and Goals
– Often leaders to do not share goals and target expectations with staff
– People can feel uncertain as to what is expected of them and default to lower levels of performance
– Most people respond well to clear guidelines, goals and well-delivered feedback

5. Freedom & Flexibility
– Provided clear performance measures are in place, workplace freedom and flexibility can help people juggle their work and home commitments and still get the job done
– If people do not feel trusted, or feel they are micro-managed they will soon seek out a more open and flexible workplace

6. Recognition & Reward
– Both cash and non-cash rewards can make people feel valued and less likely to leave
– Almost everyone responds well to recognition and praise for a job well done

7. Variety
– Many jobs can get highly repetitive and dull
– Ensure you people are given a variety of tasks to complete that are a combination of process, people, interaction, team and individual so they don’t feel their job is too repetitive
– Break up the day, week and month with interesting team and individual activites so that people are motivated to return to the same workplace every day
– People often leave simply because they are bored

8. Spend Time With Your Best People
– Too often are time is taken up coaching and managing poor performers when it is the best performers who should deserve the most attention
– High performers are too valuable to ignore and can stray from their goals if they are left to their own devices
– An investment in time with your best performers will yield higher returns in terms of outcomes and staff retention
– Consider providing your best people low cost offshore support to further boost their ability to grow additional revenues

9. Lead From The Front
– Your leaders must be prepared to set a good example to the rest of the team
– Join your staff for client meetings, staff sessions, team activities etc to demonstrate their value as part of an inclusive culture
– Staff will follow the examples set by owners and leaders – often behaviours which are not beneficial to a high performing business
– People will leave companies with poor leaders who do not lead from the front and support their people in the field or workplace

10. Communication
The single most important determinant of staff retention
– If staff feel regularly updated and trusted with company plans, goals, issues and expectations – they are much more likely to feel engaged and valued
– Ask for regular feedback and new ideas to make the business even more successful and involve your people in the process
– Ensure reporting and communication lines are clear and adhered to.

What else is important?
Knowledge is only power if we do something with it!

Navigator Consulting helps recruitment businesses to rapidly improve performance and increase profitability through a combination of advisory consulting, succession planning and events. www.navigatorconsult.com Tony Hall th@navigatorconsult.com

 

Recruitment Industry Staff Turnover Now 50%

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Staff Turnover Now 50%!

Recruitment firms are turning HALF half their team every year! Australian staffing companies with 21 to 40 employees are replacing almost half of their team every year, according to data released by RIBreport and APositive.

This is a staggering waste of money, time, resources and mental health for all involved. In 17 years of helping recruitment companies grow, I have never heard of staff turnover reaching these lofty levels. The reasons are many – huge demand for recruitment consultants (1,700 open jobs on Seek) means tight supply and increasingly risky hiring decisions. There is still a low investment in training and leadership development while many new starters are not given nearly enough support.

One of the best ways to grow a profitable recruitment business is to take on a smaller group of high quality people and support them with resourcers so they can spend more time in the market away from their screens and thereby make more placements. They will be more productive, feel better supported, earn more money and are less likely to leave.

If you are a owner or manager keen to explore offshore resourcing as a way of reducing staff turnover, making more placements and dramatically reducing cost – please send me a note and I can forward you a copy of our proven Business Case For Offshore Resourcing. 

Right now I am also working on a partnership model whereby quality private recruitment companies can work together to share costs, client opportunities, ideas and support to create better succession and potential exit value. This takes the pressure off growing too fast and wasting hundreds of thousands of dollars on staff turnover. It means firms can concentrate on servicing their target market professionally and profitably while building more tangible business value. Please let me know if you would like more information.

Email Tony Hall, Navigator Consulting, th@navigatorconsult.com

Save the date – innovative and practical 2 day Recruitment Summit @ Sea aboard 4.5 -star Carnival Spirit 3-6 November 2017.

The 4 Reasons Agency Recruiting Trumps Corporate Recruiting EVERY TIME

BY

darkside

For seven years I enjoyed the comfortable, predictable and somewhat steady life of an in-house recruiter, which, let’s face it, had its advantages.  Candidates came to me, positions just landed in my lap, and I actually got to interact with the hiring manager and internal stakeholders to inform and influence decisions.  Don’t forget I had a steady salary, benefits and great perks like “taco Tuesdays” that came along with being a part of the corporate world.It’s a good job, and while recruiting in-house can be challenging,  there are worse things to have to try to sell than jobs (if you’ve ever tried to develop business as an agency recruiter, you know exactly what I’m talking about).

Partnering with an agency is seen by most corporate recruiters as waiving the white flag.   Corporate recruiters see agency recruiters as evil, and even when they feel like they absolutely can’t do it alone, most in-house talent organizations still tend to view contingency counterparts with disdain and distrust. When I was a corporate recruiter, choosing a contingency recruiting firm admitted defeat.

While, to the rest of the world, we’re all recruiters, but to those of us on the talent front lines, both sides cling to an ‘us vs. them’ mentality, a seemingly impenetrable wall between two very different (yet strangely similar) worlds of work. Which is why I never thought I’d see the day when I decided to switch teams and go back to the proverbial dark side of agency recruiting, trading in a pretty cushy job for a life of cold calling and commissions.

Thing is, almost two years in agency recruiting,  I’m confident that I will never go back to a corporate recruiting job.  Ever. I get to work for the world’s best boss: me. Added bonus: no more having to dress up and drive into an office to sit behind a closed door sourcing and screening all day.

Most people wonder why the hell I did it, and frankly, some days I do a little bit, too. Let’s just say I have a lengthy list of rationales and reasons that I made the move. I’d like to tell you a story I think every recruiter needs to hear – and hopefully illustrate why I did what I did – and why it’s not as crazy as it might sound on the surface.

Corporate Recruiting Can Suck Sometimes.

AJT6JK Businessman about to set fire to a pile of documents

As I stated before, there are plenty of perks associated with working directly for an organization; besides knowing exactly what you’re going to make every month and having the piece of mind that you’ll be able to provide a decent lifestyle for your family, not to mention having benefits taken care of and taxes withheld by your employer.

You also have colleagues who inevitably become friends, and a brand that you’re not only representing, but that affiliation somehow seems to form some small part of your professional identity. I’ve been lucky enough to work for some of the world’s best organizations, and having a big name backing you makes your job a whole hell of a lot easier.

Even with all those factors working in favor of working in-house, I also found that there were a whole hell of a lot of downsides, too. First off, it didn’t matter if I was working on one open job or 40, I made the exact same amount of money, no matter what. Some weeks I could get away with clocking in for my 40 hours; others, though, it seemed like I slept in the office I was so busy, and there still weren’t enough hours in the day to get everything done.

Since every company I recruited for was publicly held, my professional existence was determined by quarterly financials more than my individual performance. That my job depended completely on my employer’s quarterly performance, with a loss potentially portending my losing my job, consistently kept me and most of my colleagues on edge. But that’s one of the professional hazards in this business – you can be the world’s best recruiter, but no company needs you if they’re not hiring or have headcounts frozen.

It’s nerve racking, really, like living on a recurring three month contract in perpetuity with no guarantee of renewal, even for the most exceptional performers. People might be employers’ biggest asset, but the people responsible for finding those people are too often treated like a dispensable liability instead.

It’s also tilting at windmills to try to keep every one of your many hiring managers happy; if you’re a recruiter who thinks that every hiring manager you’ve ever worked with loved you, think again – you’re either delusional or haven’t been doing this for long, but I’m going to call bullshit.

Most of the time, this comes down to nothing more than a lack of chemistry or collaboration between both parties and has little to do with performance – certain hiring managers just work better with certain recruiters.

Contingency Planning

There’s little you can do to fix this other than learn to live with it and do your job. While recruiters generally want other people to like and respect them, the truth is that sometimes, you’re going to run into someone who hates you no matter what you do, and that’s OK. If you don’t have thick skin, you’re in the wrong business.  If you are getting in this business because you “like people”, run like hell because this is the wrong industry!

While working in-house, sometimes, escalations are inevitable – the bigger the company and the bigger your workload, the more difficult meeting even the most basic expectations can be. It’s hard to get ahead when you’re treading water trying not to drown in the deluge of paperwork, processes and procedures that so often preempt a busy recruiter’s ability to do anything but the bare minimum.

I know corporate recruiters want to be all things to all people – I certainly did, but realized that being everything to everybody gets you nowhere. It’s impossible.

Expectations are often unrealistic.   Hey, how hard is recruiting, really? It leaves us constantly overworked, overwhelmed and underappreciated. Every hiring manager and every candidate thinks that they’re the top priority, but the truth is, everything in recruiting is urgent, and it’s easy to lose focus when everyone demands your attention. This no-win recruiting reality pretty much sucks when it’s your reality. Really.

Man, that feels good to finally get off my chest.

4 Reasons to Choose Agency Recruiting Over Corporate

Ever since I’ve set up my own shop, I feel like I’ve given my career a second chance. When I close a candidate for a client, it gives me the kind of energy and enthusiasm for recruiting I hadn’t felt in all of the years as a corporate recruiter. I’ve had thousands of offers accepted since I started out in 1995, but frankly, those felt like a professional responsibility rather than a personal accomplishment.

When I made the change, I felt like being reborn as a recruiter, and at that moment, I knew I had made the right choice. Here are four reasons why I left corporate and decided to go to the “dark side” of contingency recruiting.

1. I can focus on delivering real help to clients who really need it.

It’s infinitely rewarding to work with people who actually WANT and NEED your services. Sure, there are people who think that third party recruiters are a pain in the ass (hell, I was one of them not too long ago), but there’s a ton of value in partnering with external recruiters. We serve as intermediaries in the process, partnering with both sides to ensure constant communication and timely feedback, and are able to approach roles without bias to client or candidate, allowing us to focus on finding the best fit for both sides without having to sell or sugarcoat the opportunity.

Sure, there are a few corporate recruiters who do this, but they have so much on their plate quality often takes a back seat to speed, and have so much on their plates that they often don’t have the time to give every candidate the attention they want and deserve. Bad candidate experience is a necessity largely borne from expediency and external expectations, not hubris or malice.

But as a third party recruiter, candidates aren’t commodities – they’re my clients as much as employers, and it’s my job to make sure they’re happy, because they don’t HAVE to work with me. Nor do my hiring managers, who use me because they respect my recruiting efficacy and chose to trust their open opportunities to me.

It’s not like in corporate recruiting, where you’re automatically assigned a recruiter – in this case, you have to actually actively seek one out. This is a much healthier foundation for a working relationship – and successful recruiting outcomes.

2. Gambling Is Fun.

casino, gambling, people and entertainment concept - close up of poker player with chips, money and personal stuff at green casino table

I love taking risks, and wouldn’t have bet the farm on going out on my own if I didn’t enjoy rolling the dice once in a while, even in a situation where I know the odds are overwhelmingly in my favor, since I’m confident in my recruiting acumen and abilities. Still, there’s no bigger rush than putting your cards on the table knowing that you could go bust, and the constant threat of failure is more exhilarating than frightening.

This year, I will do a number of contingent searches, and I know that these are really all or nothing propositions: if I don’t make a placement, I don’t make money. This, if anything, makes me want to work harder and recruit better than anyone else out there, since I have more to lose – and more invested – than anyone.

Everything is on the line, and I know that when I close a candidate, I’ve made a winning bet – and that’s the best feeling I’ve ever had in my professional career.

3. The chase becomes thrilling.

Wow. Turns out, agency recruiting is sales – no matter what anyone says. Not only that, it’s the hardest sales job conceivable. You don’t only have to find clients (and biz dev sucks), but you’ve got to convince them that, out of the hundreds of thousands of recruiters they could work with, they should work with you. That means being able to articulate your value proposition and what gives you a competitive advantage – a good job or a good company isn’t enough to open a req on this side of the aisle.

If you can get through to a hiring manager or recruiting stakeholder and actually successfully sell them on your services, then you’ve got to negotiate terms and conditions – contracts are no fun, and often are more archaic and unreadable than your average position description. But assuming you come to terms, then the hard part really starts: you’ve got to deliver candidates, and better ones than the company themselves is capable of finding, at that.

Once you find the right candidate, you’ve got to sell them not only on the role, but why they should work with you instead of just applying directly for the job or finding another recruiter to represent them, which means you’ve got to give them a great experience, no matter what, because if they’re not engaged and confident in you, then they don’t have to work with you. So it’s really all up to you, really.

Hiring takes a really long time, or at least longer than anyone involved probably would like, which means constant expectation setting, communications and leveling with both client and candidate, a delicate balancing act of keeping everyone happy while keeping the process moving.

Once that offer finally comes, the long and excruciating process still isn’t over – you’ve got to close them. This means working whatever magic it takes to get them to ignore the many offers and counter offers the most placeable candidates are almost always considering to choose your opportunity, and making sure that when they make that choice, they actually follow through and show up – and stick around for 90 days at that.

The process is painful, but the payout is worth it.

4. The Rewards Are Worth the Risk.

I get paid for finding and closing candidates. I love that. It’s a simple reward for a straightforward service – if I work my ass off to help your organization find the talent it needs to succeed, then I know any payment is easily worth the piece of mind it affords to my clients. This is why I don’t want to put a butt in a seat, I want to find key hires who will make a difference – not least because they are likely to give me business in the future, but also because it means that I’ve delivered as promised to both them and their new employer.

Having the right third party partner, I’ve found, is one of the biggest competitive advantages any employer has for catalyzing growth, finding the best talent on the market and having an objective expert committed to helping your organization succeed, which is mostly impossible without the right people. The best things in life aren’t free, but you get what you pay for – and I know if I can’t give my clients demonstrable recruiting ROI for that fee, then I have no reason being in business to begin with.

Speaking of selling: if you want to work with a third party recruiter who gets life on the inside, and can be on target every time, all the time, hit me up. Hey, now that I’m on the dark side, I’ve seen the light – and am loving every minute of it.

@willrecruits

 

Read more at http://bullseyerecruiting.net/the-4-reasons-agency-recruiting-trumps-corporate-recruiting-every-time/#vg4oYveuyvjz0Ul2.99